STEM CELL THERAPY FOR COMMUNITY ACQUIRED PNEUMONIA INDUCED SEPSIS

ico-book ABOUT

Sepsis is a clinical syndrome caused by a systemic deregulated inflammatory immune response to an infection. Community-acquired pneumonia refers to infections of the lung that, if not properly controlled, may result in the development of sepsis. Severe sepsis has an increasing impact on public health and is one of the leading causes of mortality in the intensive care units. Therefore, there is a high need for new therapies to improve the treatment of sepsis.

ico-moleculePROJECT

SEPCELL aims to provide a new approach to the treatment of severe sepsis. Our overall hypothesis is that allogeneic expanded adipose mesenchymal stem cells (eASCs), based on their immunomodulatory properties, may have the potential to modulate the immune response in severe sepsis patients, which may result in clinical benefit. Based on the preclinical and previous clinical evidence of the efficacy of eASCs to modulate the inflammatory response, SEPCELL intends to test in the clinical setting (phase Ib/IIa clinical trial) the safety and feasibility of eASC treatment in patients developing severe sepsis due to community-acquired pneumonia.

The consortium is formed by a combination of six European research institutes, medical entities and biotech SMEs, congregating the necessary competence, expertise and resources to achieve the project goals.

OBJECTIVES

The overall aim of this proposal is to outline the development of an effective and safe cell therapy for severe sepsis through rebalancing the functionality of the immune system and supporting the body’s natural capacity to regenerate damaged tissues and organs.
The key scientific/technical objectives and the measures of success for this project are to:

  1. Understand the mode-of-action of adipose mesenchymal stem cells in severe sepsis patients
  2. Search for biomarkers which can be used as prognostic and/or diagnostic tools.
  3. Assess the safety and potential efficacy of cell therapy in a Ib/IIa clinical study in community-acquired pneumonia severe sepsis.

 

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